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Optical Toy : CAMERA OBSCURA BOX

Optical Toy
adapted by Les COOKSON (USA)

A very nice CAMERA OBSCURA in solid mahogany hardwood with beautiful protective authentic oil finish.

IMPORT USA

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115,00 € tax incl.

JOU3487

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Optical Toy adapted by Les COOKSON (USA)

From United States, a very nice CAMERA OBSCURA in solid mahogany hardwood with beautiful protective authentic oil finish.
Hand crafted with attention to detail.

  • Dimensions :
    17.7 cm wide x 16.5 cm high x 15 cm long
  • Solid Brass Lens tube moves in and out
    to focus on objects about one foot away to infinitely into the distance
  • Projection screen is 12.7 cm x 12.7 cm
    (2 screens provided : ground glass & a clear acrylic glass)
  • Comes with a standard (1/4-20) tripod mount
  • Weight 2.5 kg approx
  • Hand crafted in solid mahogany hardwood with protective oil finish

IMPORT USA

The CAMERA OBSCURA is an optical device that projects an image of its surroundings on a screen. It is used in drawing and for entertainment, and was one of the inventions that led to photography.

The Camera Obscura - image 1
(click to enlarge)

In the 17th, 18th and 19th century many artists were aided by the use of the CAMERA OBSCURA : Jan Vermeer, Canaletto, Guardi and Paul Sandby are just a few who used the CAMERA OBSCURA to make their beautiful masterpieces.

The Camera Obscura - image 2
(click to enlarge)

The CAMERA OBSCURA was the beginning for modern cameras and today they are a hard to find collectible; as well as, a fun and practical drawing tool. The great thing about our CAMERA OBSCURAS is that they are not only a beautiful replicas, but it is fully functional and can be used for hands-on demonstrations that recreate the magic of the past. Perfect for any classroom that is teaching the history of cameras or art-from kindergartners to grad students they’ll all be captivated and edified.

The Camera Obscura - image 3
(click to enlarge)

Video :

 


PLEASE NOTE :

in this video, the objects filmed by this CAMERA OBSCURA are :

  • The Thaumatrope TROMPE-L’OEIL, available HERE >
  • The ZOETROPE REPLICA, available HERE >
  • EDISON’s flipbooks, available HERE >




Some views with the CAMERA OBSCURA :

Picture with the CAMERA OBSCURA

Picture with the CAMERA OBSCURA

CAMERA OBSCURA focused on the foreground :

Picture with the CAMERA OBSCURA

CAMERA OBSCURA focused on the background :

Picture with the CAMERA OBSCURA

 


 

Clip using the CAMERA OBSCURA of Les COOKSON :


APRÈS UN RÊVE :
Every scene with Tina GUO and the cello is actual footage from the camera obscura’s screen.
(a clip by Rich RAGSDALE - USA)

 

  • Dimensions :
    17.7 cm wide x 16.5 cm high x 15 cm long
  • Solid Brass Lens tube moves in and out
    to focus on objects about one foot away to infinitely into the distance
  • Projection screen is 12.7 cm x 12.7 cm
    (2 screens provided : ground glass & a clear acrylic glass)
  • Comes with a standard (1/4-20) tripod mount
  • Weight 2.5 kg approx
  • Hand crafted in solid mahogany hardwood with protective oil finish

IMPORT USA


Les COOKSON

Les COOKSON is an artist and inventor at heart and has been drawing, painting and inventing for as long as he can remember. He started his work reconstruction optical devices through his interest in the painting techniques of the Great Masters, and his work and interest has spread to include many of the fascinating and magical devices of the past.

Today Les is the foremost craftsman in this arena. He has been building, researching and designing camera obscuras, camera lucidas and other devices for years, and has sold thousands of them all over the world. His creations have been featured in films and moves, adorned the halls of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC., been demonstrated at many schools and universities—they are beautiful enough to put out on display, but too fascinating to put down.

to be continued...

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